Author Topic: Blue Berries on Tree  (Read 1855 times)

mb

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Blue Berries on Tree
« on: September 23, 2012, 03:36:30 PM »
South Florida, last week.  Tree about 10ft tall.  Blue berries.

mb

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2012, 03:42:22 PM »
Pic of leaves.

heather

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2012, 04:41:49 PM »
You're pictures are a bit fuzzy, so it's hard to guess.  At first glance I'd say Raphiolepis indica, Indian Hawthorne

http://www.cuyamaca.net/oh170/Characteristic%20Pages/Rhaphiolepis%20indica.htm

The berry is shown on the right.

Do make sure that this is not a vine climbing on a tree for support.  Blue berries this time of year always have me on the alert of Boston Ivy, (Parthenocisis tricuspidata).  Very poisonous.


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mb

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2012, 05:13:32 PM »
Looks pretty similar  :)

QuinQuefolia

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2012, 06:05:17 PM »
Are you sure that is part of the tree?

The berries and leaf is not correct for Hawthorn. It looks like a Virginia Creeper that may be hanging out in a tree. However, the leaves are not exactly correct  ???

What you have is some type of vine given the way the branch is red and segmented.

We need more pictures!

Green Deane

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2012, 06:45:24 PM »
NO NO NO NO!...That's a vine on the tree. It is Virginia Creeper. Avoid the plant. It can cause contact dermatitis in some folks and the berries can put you on kidney dialysis for life and can kill kids. Some very misguided sites say they are edible but that is an error perpetuated from a Department of Agriculture pamplet in the 30s. If anyone tells you this (or the leaves or the tendrils) are edible have them prove it then and there... and wait a week to see if they are in the hospital or on the obit page before trying yourself.

It may be that in some years in some places you might survive as the offending chemical might be low but it is just not worth the risk. I challenged one website that said it was edible and the owner said she nibble the end of one tendril once. THAT'S THE PROBLEM OF INTERNET CREDIBILITY. This is definitly one plant where you say to the person prove it.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2012, 06:52:39 PM by Green Deane »

Steve

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2012, 11:47:03 PM »
It's good to know these are definitely toxic.  I was debating on growing these as a plant for both bird and human consumption.  Thank you, GD!

mb

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2012, 06:08:38 AM »
Thanks guys.  There were vines all over the trees in that area.

Janos

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2012, 11:28:04 AM »
Aye, as has been stated, Virginia Creeper. One of those pretty vines with nice fruit that looks like it SHOULD be edible in some form, but will put you in  the ER quicker than all get-out.

This is one of those dozen+ truly toxic plants that should be on every wild forager's basic 'get to know list', along with water and poison hemlock.

Darren

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2012, 01:11:32 PM »
Maybe it's just me, but I think the fruit cluster looks like a molecular drawing from a chemistry class.
When all is said and done, there is usually more said than done.

5piceHunter

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2012, 02:59:12 PM »
Haha Darren, yes reminded me of a molecule too  ;D.

By the way, I just don't see those berries as appetizing. They appear just as unpleasant to me as Indian hawthorn berries...the berries have no shine (dull), the "colorful" fruit stems, seem to say "stay away", etc. I have been wrong about what is, and what is not edible in the past (from time to time)...but there are just somethings I automatically/intuitively would not bother with.
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Steve

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2012, 03:21:20 PM »
These were taking over the yard of the last place I lived.  I never ate them then, my understanding then was that they are toxic.  Since then I ran across something that suggested the opposite.  Like I said, I'm glad to know they are not good to eat.  And they don't look appetizing.  I am looking into some vines to grow.  I'm strongly considering pyracantha.  I don't want any toxic plants on my property, if I can help it.  Plus, virginia creeper seems to be invasive here, in this part of California.

Green Deane

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Re: Blue Berries on Tree
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2012, 05:55:17 PM »
These were taking over the yard of the last place I lived.  I never ate them then, my understanding then was that they are toxic.  Since then I ran across something that suggested the opposite.  Like I said, I'm glad to know they are not good to eat.  And they don't look appetizing.  I am looking into some vines to grow.  I'm strongly considering pyracantha.  I don't want any toxic plants on my property, if I can help it.  Plus, virginia creeper seems to be invasive here, in this part of California.

An FDA researcher named E. Yanovsky (not an ethnobotanist) did a pamplet in the 1936 in which he mentioned two Indian tribes ate it.  At the time and since other experts say he got it wrong among them Professor Daniel Austin, author of Florida Ethnobotany. In reference to the Virgina Creeper he said the famous John Smith said it was bad and Yanovsky said it was edible. Austin writes on page 481 of his work "One of them is wrong, and I doubt that it was Smith."