Author Topic: Mick Dodge  (Read 3413 times)

upnorth

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #30 on: January 15, 2014, 09:00:52 PM »
I had looked into those!  How are they for water repellency?  I noticed they didn't have any that were full leather, only suede.

aktrekker

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2014, 12:42:52 AM »
The soles are rubber. As long as I keep the leather oiled I've never had wet feet. But you have to understand that mukluks are meant for snow, not wading through water.
By full leather I assume you mean like boot leather. That wouldn't be a mukluk, it would be a boot. Traditionally mukluks were made from brain-tanned moose, caribou, or seal, making them like buckskin. Sometimes the caribou and seal weren't tanned at all. Suede is the modern version of buckskin - soft and flexible, and it absorbs the oils very well.
With the wool felt liner and 2 wool felt insoles you can stand in the snow at -10F and your feet won't get cold. They are so comfortable it feels like you aren't wearing anything (on your feet).

aktrekker

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2014, 01:04:10 AM »
According to the comments in the above linked video, Mick doesn't live in the forest. He owns property with a well-manicured lawn. Apparently the TV show is just another reality show, just like all the other survival shows. While the individuals might be real you just can't tell because the show isn't real.

upnorth

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #33 on: January 16, 2014, 06:36:31 AM »
The soles are rubber. As long as I keep the leather oiled I've never had wet feet. But you have to understand that mukluks are meant for snow, not wading through water.
By full leather I assume you mean like boot leather. That wouldn't be a mukluk, it would be a boot. Traditionally mukluks were made from brain-tanned moose, caribou, or seal, making them like buckskin. Sometimes the caribou and seal weren't tanned at all. Suede is the modern version of buckskin - soft and flexible, and it absorbs the oils very well.
With the wool felt liner and 2 wool felt insoles you can stand in the snow at -10F and your feet won't get cold. They are so comfortable it feels like you aren't wearing anything (on your feet).

Great info!  I had always assumed that suede was not good at water repellency.  Also, what is the difference between suede and split leather? 
What kind of oil do you use?  All I ever see in "how to care for" instructions for suede is the spray.  I don't want to use that.
The Steger's seem to have the warmest claim.

I wouldn't wade through water, but the reason I have to ask is that, many times, I've been walking/snowshoeing and have had my boot dunk in water a few inches (quickly in and out) when I stepped in an area that was marshy under the snow.  It has to at least be able to handle that, and not wreak the boot.

Green Deane

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #34 on: January 16, 2014, 07:52:14 AM »
I am by no means an expert on this, but my mother was a cobbler. Split leather is very thin leather, made from the lower, less tough part of the hide. It is uneven with varying texture. Suede is split leather that has been buffed to have a uniform, smooth texture.

mikeconroy

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #35 on: January 16, 2014, 08:42:35 AM »
From Tandy Leather Factory website:

Split - This refers to the undersection of a piece of leather that has been split into two or more thicknesses. Splits are usually embossed with a design and finished or sueded.

Suede Split - Leather that has been sanded to produce a nap.
Mike
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mikeconroy

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #36 on: January 16, 2014, 08:52:24 AM »
Great info!  I had always assumed that suede was not good at water repellency.  Also, what is the difference between suede and split leather? 
What kind of oil do you use?  All I ever see in "how to care for" instructions for suede is the spray.  I don't want to use that.
The Steger's seem to have the warmest claim.

I wouldn't wade through water, but the reason I have to ask is that, many times, I've been walking/snowshoeing and have had my boot dunk in water a few inches (quickly in and out) when I stepped in an area that was marshy under the snow.  It has to at least be able to handle that, and not wreak the boot.
The reason for the silicone spray on suede is that it will not destroy the appearance of the nap, oil and grease will. If appearance is not an issue, you can use these products on the suede leather. I use mink oil for many of my leather items and it works well. When I first get the item, I will oil it once a day for 3 days before wearing or using it, then again about a week later. After that depends on how often I use it, what I use it for, what its exposure is to the elements, etc. There are many other fine products out there too.

Don't try to purchase from Tandy though, they are way overpriced on everything and their customer service is really a sales force. I buy my products from Springfield Leather but that is because I can go into their store when I am in that town. Any good leather store will have a fine selection.

If you cannot find one, here is the link to Springfield Leather cleaners and conditioners page:
http://springfieldleather.com/9/Cleaners%2C-Conditioner%2C-Tanning/

Edit: Old timers talked about bear grease (yes, grease rendered from harvested bear), but I have never seen it or used it. They always said it was the best for boots.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2014, 08:54:29 AM by mikeconroy »
Mike
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Green Deane

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2014, 09:07:28 AM »
My mother used lanolin which I think is squeezed from sheep hair. 

aktrekker

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #38 on: January 16, 2014, 11:39:22 AM »
I've used neat's foot oil and it works great. The suede really soaks it up. But you have to give it some drying time before wearing them. Mink oil will also work but you might want to heat it a little bit before applying.
I've also used a silicon based liquid and it also works well. You might want to use 2 coats, letting it dry completely between applications.
No matter what waterproofing you use, a quick dunk shouldn't be a problem, especially with the rubber soles.

Suede gets a little different treatment than a regular split. If you look at a split you can see some skin layers unless it's very thin. If you look at suede you don't see the layers. Suede is also very flexible like cloth. Splits are generally used in furniture like leather sofas and tend to be a little stiffer with almost a plastic feel.

I used to shop at Tandy before it was Tandy. It used to be called The Leather Factory and was run by a Texas corporation. Apparently the owner died and the company was re-branded as Tandy Leather. It used to be a store for serious people like saddle makers. Now it's more of a hobbyist store and is very expensive - $13 for a rabbit skin!
I found Springfield Leather through Amazon and have bought some stuff from them. They are selling lots of Tandy products but slightly cheaper than the Tandy stores.

upnorth

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #39 on: January 16, 2014, 05:36:06 PM »
 Thanks for all the great tips and explanations!   As kids we used mink oil on all our leather stuff.  For a few years now they (stores that sell camping/adventure stuff) recommend bees wax base (cream) on leather.  The claim was that mink oil degraded the leather over time, bees wax did not.  No idea how true that is.  I always prefer to lean towards the natural substances.

Most products recommend to pre-warm the item, for better and more thorough absorbtion.

mikeconroy

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #40 on: January 16, 2014, 06:42:39 PM »
Mink oil also comes in liquid form so you can either apply it and let it soak in or rub it in.
Mike
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myakka

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #41 on: January 16, 2014, 06:50:12 PM »
According to the comments in the above linked video, Mick doesn't live in the forest. He owns property with a well-manicured lawn. Apparently the TV show is just another reality show, just like all the other survival shows. While the individuals might be real you just can't tell because the show isn't real.

Thanks AK.   This makes more sense to me.   Mick might have some wisdom and insights, but the show portrayed him as living in the grass hut, and something about it itched my spidey-sense.
Skills Beats Stuff

Swampy

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #42 on: January 16, 2014, 09:14:37 PM »
This is so funny!  I've been wanting to bring up "barefooting", but wasn't sure if this should be the place.

I was born with flat feet.  By my late teens it was affecting my ability to walk long distances, running was always out, unless I sprinted.  Hard wood floors barefoot killed me.

No matter how fancy the shoes, or the orthotics, nothing really helped. 

By chance, I heard about "fox walking".  Did many searches on the internet.  You should have seen the stuff I found!  One thing leads to another, and I'm looking up the history of the shoe!  Wow!  The shoes of today (with arch support and cushioned heel) realy only started in the early seventies.  Before that, runners wore running flats.  The studies done on what a foot really should look like, on a person who never wore shoes is amazing.  Toes have muscles!  Feet are muscular.  Toes are splayed. 

 Look up feet of aboriginals of Australia.
Look up at what point in history did foot (and knee) pain begin.
Look up the reasons why native North Americans walked the way they did (Hint: hunting has a lot to do with it).
Look up the history of the shoe (hint: they were not made for walking!)
Look up the term "cow walking".

I had to do something about my shoe/foot problem.  I couldn't keep spending huge money on shoes /boots that didn't help.  And in went into nicely with my decision to simplify everything in my life.  What a huge difference!  It took me almost 3 years, but I can now go barefoot or usually with minimalist shoes.  My favorite is Xero shoes (sandals).  They have a website.  It's as bare as you can go and still have protection.

There is so much out there on this topic.  And books.  It's like re-learning how to walk all over again.  It's worth it.  Even if it's just to stengthen your feet.

Modern shoes:  The mother of all scams.
                                                Thanks for the barefoot sandal site Xero shoes
In Wildness is the preservation of the world. Stay Wild. Mick Dodge Rules

froglevel

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #43 on: January 16, 2014, 11:34:51 PM »
According to the comments in the above linked video, Mick doesn't live in the forest. He owns property with a well-manicured lawn. Apparently the TV show is just another reality show, just like all the other survival shows. While the individuals might be real you just can't tell because the show isn't real.

Thanks AK.   This makes more sense to me.   Mick might have some wisdom and insights, but the show portrayed him as living in the grass hut, and something about it itched my spidey-sense.

Just another TV farce deceiving the foolish. Doesn’t belong in… "Survival Foraging, Living Off The Land"

The tv show has nothing to do with reality, it’s a farce. Who was it said “A Man of my own heart. I think I have kin”  ;)

Janos

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Re: Mick Dodge
« Reply #44 on: January 17, 2014, 12:20:04 AM »
If such shows get people interested in the outdoors, nature, and foraging, that sounds like a win to me.

Very few are going to take any TV show at total face value.

I don't even take Ray Mears' videos at 100% face value, but there's still some very good stuff there.

I've noticed a lot of harshness and negativity from folks lately on here.

Didn't you people get the memo? That's my official job. You all suck at it. So cut it out.  ;D

Or as someone here once put it to me, to endeavor to provide "More illumination, less flame".
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 12:22:01 AM by Janos »